First war affect british society

Impact on Everyday Life IV. Impact on Political Culture V. To face the challenge of total war both political practice and economy had to be transformed radically and, in a dramatically short period of time, hundreds of thousands of men had to be raised for the military forces.

First war affect british society

Share via Email A sign chalked on the front of a shop in the east end of London assures people in that the business is Russian-owned. For men, women, and children confined to the home front between andexhilarating surges of patriotic energies and the evaporation of many restraints were fleeting First war affect british society when set against the loss of loved ones.

Children woke to find that their fathers had left for distant battlefields while they slept. Three hundred thousand never saw their fathers again;wives received the dreaded telegram informing them that their husbands had been killed. Countless others discovered the meaning of suffering.

When Phyllis Kelly first heard that her lover Eric Appleby had been seriously wounded, she immediately put pen to paper.

I simply have sat and shivered with such an awful clutching fear at my heart It will be the end of everything that matters Eric was already dead. The "awful clutching fear" that sapped morale presented the British government with the formidable task of rallying not only the troops but the entire nation to the war effort.

Loyalty was not guaranteed. In "Red Clydeside", there were anti-war demonstrations, industrial action in essential industries, rent strikes, and even cries for a Marxist revolution.

Irish republicans went ahead with an armed rising at Easter, Curfews and censorship From the declaration of war, the authorities realised that they had to act decisively.

How Did the First World War Affect British Society Essay Example | Graduateway

They were empowered to take over any factory or workshop. Curfews and censorship were imposed. Severe restrictions on movement were introduced.

Discussing military matters in public became a serious offence. Almost anyone could be arrested for "causing alarm". In the interests of the work ethic, British summer time commenced, opening hours for pubs were cut, and beer was watered down.

Women who were suspected of having venereal disease could be stopped by the police and subjected to a gynaecological examination. A woman with VD could be prosecuted for having sexual intercourse with a serviceman.

It did not matter that he could have been her husband, and may have given her the disease in the first place. Suspicion of outsiders was high. Dora and the Aliens Restriction Act severely curtailed the civil liberties of non-British-born subjects even naturalised citizens who had resided in the UK for decades.

They were required to register, obtain permits if they intended to travel more than five miles, and were prohibited from entering certain areas. More than 32, were held in internment camps or repatriated.

In Liverpool, businesses were destroyed. In London, of the 21 Metropolitan police districts, only two were free from riots. It was, as the Daily Record observed, "not an uplifting spectacle to see this country descending to trivial and hysterical methods of vengeance".

More typically, DH Lawrence admitted: I am mad with rage myself. I would like to kill a million Germans - two million. He was accused of spying and forced out of his cottage in St Ives.

Spy fever It would not have helped Lawrence that he was widely believed to have lax morals.

First war affect british society

Indeed, in the summer ofthe two fears bonded. Noel Pemberton Billing, MP for East Hertfordshire and publisher of right-wing newspapers, claimed to have a copy of a blacklist of 47, traitors and spies in high places in Britain.

Many were, he insisted, inflamed by the "cult of the clitoris", betraying the "sacred secrets of state" in "lesbian ecstasy". Heterosexual passions were also said to have been kindled by wartime excitements. Freed from the masculine governance of fathers, husbands and brothers, women were accused of khaki fever.

They love the boys in khaki. They detest walking with civilians. They love the darkies!How did the First World War change British society? The Great War involved most of the adult population either 'head on' or discretely.

On average, 6 million men served in Britain's armed forces during the course of the war. Essay How Did the First World War Change British Society? How did the First World War change British society? The Great War involved most of the adult population either 'head on' or discretely. F ear, grief, sorrow: these are the overriding emotions of war.

For men, women, and children confined to the home front between and , exhilarating surges of patriotic energies and the. How did the First World War change British society?

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The Great War involved most of the adult population either 'head on' or discretely. On average, 6 million men served in Britain's armed forces during the course of the war.

If you have the appropriate software installed, you can download article citation data to the citation manager of your choice.

Simply select your manager software from the list below and click on download. British Rule in India at the End of the First World War By the end of the First World War the British Rule in India was still powerful, but would soon break down. However, thousands of Indians fought in the war hoping that in return they would be given home rule.

First world war: How British society changed at home | World news | The Guardian